Technical aspects of automobiles

Torn CV boot prognosis

My car (FWD) has a torn rubber  boot covering the
passenger’s side CV joint.

The mechanic said it wasn’t possible to silicon it up
or anything – it had to be replaced, at a cost comparable
to that of replacing the joint entirely (minus parts of course).

He also said that if I did nothing, it would dry up within
about a month because the grease lubricating it would
get flung out the tear in the boot.

Is this all correct, and what should I do?

.
posted by admin in Без рубрики and have Comments (20)

20 Responses to “Torn CV boot prognosis”

  1. admin says:

    Old Wolf wrote:

    > My car (FWD) has a torn rubber  boot covering the
    > passenger’s side CV joint.

    > The mechanic said it wasn’t possible to silicon it up
    > or anything – it had to be replaced, at a cost comparable
    > to that of replacing the joint entirely (minus parts of course).

    > He also said that if I did nothing, it would dry up within
    > about a month because the grease lubricating it would
    > get flung out the tear in the boot.

    > Is this all correct, and what should I do?

    You might want to fix it before the wheel and axle fall
    off in about a month or two.
    Get a complete rebuilt axle assembly.
    It is cheaper.

  2. admin says:

    On Sun, 23 Sep 2007 17:17:25 -0700, Old Wolf <oldw…@inspire.net.nz>
    wrote:

    >My car (FWD) has a torn rubber  boot covering the
    >passenger’s side CV joint.

    >The mechanic said it wasn’t possible to silicon it up
    >or anything – it had to be replaced, at a cost comparable
    >to that of replacing the joint entirely (minus parts of course).

    >He also said that if I did nothing, it would dry up within
    >about a month because the grease lubricating it would
    >get flung out the tear in the boot.

    >Is this all correct, and what should I do?

    That is correct.  If you are feeling froggy they make a split boot
    that you can put on that has a seam that can be glued but they are a
    really short term fix.  Doubt you will find a pro willing to put one
    on.

    I would go ahead and replace the axle and boot at the same time.  You
    have to do all the labor anyway and the joint is probably worn anyway.

                     Steve B.

  3. admin says:

    - Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -

    "Steve B." wrote:

    > On Sun, 23 Sep 2007 17:17:25 -0700, Old Wolf <oldw…@inspire.net.nz>
    > wrote:

    > >My car (FWD) has a torn rubber  boot covering the
    > >passenger’s side CV joint.

    > >The mechanic said it wasn’t possible to silicon it up
    > >or anything – it had to be replaced, at a cost comparable
    > >to that of replacing the joint entirely (minus parts of course).

    > >He also said that if I did nothing, it would dry up within
    > >about a month because the grease lubricating it would
    > >get flung out the tear in the boot.

    > >Is this all correct, and what should I do?

    > That is correct.  If you are feeling froggy they make a split boot
    > that you can put on that has a seam that can be glued but they are a
    > really short term fix.  Doubt you will find a pro willing to put one
    > on.

    > I would go ahead and replace the axle and boot at the same time.  You
    > have to do all the labor anyway and the joint is probably worn anyway.

    >                  Steve B.

    And even if you go with the split boot, you would need to completely
    clean out the joint and regrease it as you have no way to tell how much
    road grit has already got in and mixed with the grease making a nice
    abrasive slurry. CV Joints just aren’t worth messing with trying to
    salvage, if the boot is torn, consider the joint trash and replace the
    whole thing unless you like the idea of loosing your balls while backing
    out of a space at the grocery store. I’ve seen it happen, with a half
    dozen nice big balls rolling around on the ground.

  4. admin says:

    On Sep 23, 8:17 pm, Old Wolf <oldw…@inspire.net.nz> wrote:

    > My car (FWD) has a torn rubber  boot covering the
    > passenger’s side CV joint.

    > The mechanic said it wasn’t possible to silicon it up
    > or anything

    Silicone up a rubber boot that is constantly spinning and twisting?
    C’mon….

    > – it had to be replaced, at a cost comparable
    > to that of replacing the joint entirely (minus parts of course).

    Makes sense to me since the same disassembly occurs.

    > He also said that if I did nothing, it would dry up within
    > about a month because the grease lubricating it would
    > get flung out the tear in the boot.

    Since the boot is there to keep moisture away from the joint and keep
    the lubricant in place around the joint, yes that’s also correct.

    > Is this all correct, and what should I do?

    Well, if I weere you I would fix it before it locks up.

    Although since you apparently want to save money by using silicone,
    you might also try some muffler patch tape.

  5. admin says:

    "Steve B." <n…@none.com> wrote in message > That is correct.  If you are

    feeling froggy they make a split boot

    > that you can put on that has a seam that can be glued but they are a
    > really short term fix.  Doubt you will find a pro willing to put one
    > on.

    Exactly right.  I have tried to use the split boots in the past, and no
    matter how carefully
    I do it, they seem to fail quickly.  They might ok for a short term patch
    job, but you
    need to do it right.

    I have seen a boot that can be expanded and slipped over the CV joint from
    the transmission
    side, which might allow the job to be done without pulling the axle
    halfshaft out of the hub.
    But, unless you are sure the CV is good, there is little to be gained.

    > I would go ahead and replace the axle and boot at the same time.  You
    > have to do all the labor anyway and the joint is probably worn anyway.

    Again, probably right.  The joint may not be worn, but it is a lot of work
    to
    replace the boot (properly) and then find the joint itself fails.

  6. admin says:

    Old Wolf wrote:
    > My car (FWD) has a torn rubber  boot covering the
    > passenger’s side CV joint.

    > The mechanic said it wasn’t possible to silicon it up
    > or anything – it had to be replaced, at a cost comparable
    > to that of replacing the joint entirely (minus parts of course).

    > He also said that if I did nothing, it would dry up within
    > about a month because the grease lubricating it would
    > get flung out the tear in the boot.

    > Is this all correct, and what should I do?

    That is all correct.

    Usually when ‘I’ see torn boots on CV’s or ball joints or tie rod ends,
    that means the part has worn enough to go beyond the design specs of the
    boot so it stretches and tears.  (unless this is an off road vehicle,
    where sticks and stones come into play)

    I would replace the whole thing because the labor to fix it properly is
    the same or higher due to cleaning as to change it.

    Mike
    86/00 CJ7 Laredo, 33×9.5 BFG Muds, ‘glass nose to tail in ’00
    88 Cherokee 235 BFG AT’s – Gone to the rust pile…
    Canadian Off Road Trips Photos:  Non members can still view!
    Jan/06 http://www.imagestation.com/album/pictures.html?id=2115147590
    (More Off Road album links at bottom of the view page)

  7. admin says:

    Old Wolf  <oldw…@inspire.net.nz> wrote:

    >My car (FWD) has a torn rubber  boot covering the
    >passenger’s side CV joint.

    >The mechanic said it wasn’t possible to silicon it up
    >or anything – it had to be replaced, at a cost comparable
    >to that of replacing the joint entirely (minus parts of course).

    Yup, this is true.

    >He also said that if I did nothing, it would dry up within
    >about a month because the grease lubricating it would
    >get flung out the tear in the boot.

    This is also true.

    >Is this all correct, and what should I do?

    Replace the joint entirely.  If you replace just the boot, the chances
    of early failure are high, and it’s not much more work just to replace the
    whole damn thing.
    –scott

    "C’est un Nagra.  C’est suisse, et tres, tres precis."

  8. admin says:

    - Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -

    John S. wrote:
    > On Sep 23, 8:17 pm, Old Wolf <oldw…@inspire.net.nz> wrote:
    >> My car (FWD) has a torn rubber  boot covering the
    >> passenger’s side CV joint.

    >> The mechanic said it wasn’t possible to silicon it up
    >> or anything

    > Silicone up a rubber boot that is constantly spinning and twisting?
    > C’mon….

    >> – it had to be replaced, at a cost comparable
    >> to that of replacing the joint entirely (minus parts of course).

    > Makes sense to me since the same disassembly occurs.

    >> He also said that if I did nothing, it would dry up within
    >> about a month because the grease lubricating it would
    >> get flung out the tear in the boot.

    > Since the boot is there to keep moisture away from the joint and keep
    > the lubricant in place around the joint, yes that’s also correct.

    >> Is this all correct, and what should I do?

    > Well, if I weere you I would fix it before it locks up.

    > Although since you apparently want to save money by using silicone,
    > you might also try some muffler patch tape.

    Won’t hold.  On my old Jimmy I had the same problem – busted boot, and
    nothing worked – tried duct tape, tried zip ties… eventually I just
    changed the stupid axle.  Wasn’t hard, the biggest problem was that on
    my car you had to pop the tie rod for clearance and was worn too and
    rusted to the inner tie rod, so one worn CV boot at $5 became a new
    axle, new shock, new tie rods and adjuster.

    But yeah, the only proper way to fix it is a new axle shaft.

    Ray

  9. admin says:

    Mike Romain <roma…@sympatico.ca> wrote in news:46f7c2f4$0$15183
    $9a6e1…@unlimited.newshosting.com:

    > Usually when ‘I’ see torn boots on CV’s or ball joints or tie rod ends,
    > that means the part has worn enough to go beyond the design specs of the
    > boot so it stretches and tears.

    A split CV joint boot is primarily caused by flexing stresses.
    Steering, cold, and high ride height exacerbate these.

    From what I’ve seen they take about a year or two from the first signs of
    cracking to when they finally tear open entirely.

    CV joint boots are easy to catch before they actually split. A couple of
    times per year, turn the steering wheel all the way to one side. Standing
    in front of the wheel on that side, peek at the inside of the wheel where
    the joint goes into the steering knuckle. With the wheel turned all the way
    to the one side, the boot pleats are spread apart as far as they will go,
    and cracking will be obvious. Repeat for other side.
    You don’t even have to jack the car up or don shop overalls.

    > (unless this is an off road vehicle,
    > where sticks and stones come into play)

    > I would replace the whole thing because the labor to fix it properly is
    > the same or higher due to cleaning as to change it.

    Agreed.


    Tegger

  10. admin says:

    On Sep 24, 12:08 pm, ray <rollingviolat…@domain.invalid.com> wrote:

    - Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -

    > John S. wrote:
    > > On Sep 23, 8:17 pm, Old Wolf <oldw…@inspire.net.nz> wrote:
    > >> My car (FWD) has a torn rubber  boot covering the
    > >> passenger’s side CV joint.

    > >> The mechanic said it wasn’t possible to silicon it up
    > >> or anything

    > > Silicone up a rubber boot that is constantly spinning and twisting?
    > > C’mon….

    > >> – it had to be replaced, at a cost comparable
    > >> to that of replacing the joint entirely (minus parts of course).

    > > Makes sense to me since the same disassembly occurs.

    > >> He also said that if I did nothing, it would dry up within
    > >> about a month because the grease lubricating it would
    > >> get flung out the tear in the boot.

    > > Since the boot is there to keep moisture away from the joint and keep
    > > the lubricant in place around the joint, yes that’s also correct.

    > >> Is this all correct, and what should I do?

    > > Well, if I weere you I would fix it before it locks up.

    > > Although since you apparently want to save money by using silicone,
    > > you might also try some muffler patch tape.

    > Won’t hold.  On my old Jimmy I had the same problem – busted boot, and
    > nothing worked – tried duct tape, tried zip ties… eventually I just
    > changed the stupid axle.  Wasn’t hard, the biggest problem was that on
    > my car you had to pop the tie rod for clearance and was worn too and
    > rusted to the inner tie rod, so one worn CV boot at $5 became a new
    > axle, new shock, new tie rods and adjuster.

    > But yeah, the only proper way to fix it is a new axle shaft.

    > Ray- Hide quoted text –

    > – Show quoted text –

    I was making a point…not serious.

  11. admin says:

    Old Wolf wrote:
    > My car (FWD) has a torn rubber  boot covering the
    > passenger’s side CV joint.

    > The mechanic said it wasn’t possible to silicon it up
    > or anything – it had to be replaced, at a cost comparable
    > to that of replacing the joint entirely (minus parts of course).

    > He also said that if I did nothing, it would dry up within
    > about a month because the grease lubricating it would
    > get flung out the tear in the boot.

    > Is this all correct, and what should I do?

    He is correct.

    Depending on the make and model it may be faster and cheaper to replace
    the entire axle assembly. On most domestics this is the better option
    than even bothering to replace one joint. Keep in mind that if one side
    has torn the other side may not be far behind either.

    Not really a hard job for a DIYer. Jack up the front end. Pull the tire.
    Loosen the large axle retaining nut on the hub end. On most you will
    want to look at how the lower ball joint comes out of the knuckle and
    get it all loosened up. Now on many all you need to do to remove the
    axle is to get a couple of pry bars and go between the inner joint and
    the transaxle housing and pop it free (kind of like your pulling a nail)
    You may lose some trans fluid depending on what angle your working at.
    If so remember to check it and add the correct amount when your done.
    Now once you have the inner joint free, go and turn the steering wheel
    to the opposite of the side your working on. So in your case turn LEFT.
    Now give the axle a good sharp rap with a dead blow hammer or use a
    block of wood and a hammer. Take the nut off and push the lower ball
    joint connection apart. Now rotate the steering knuckle to the right by
    hand and work the axle out of the hub at the same time. Remove the axle
    and reverse the procedure to install the new one. On a lot of domestics
    it’s about an hours job.


    Steve W.

  12. admin says:

    - Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -

    John S. wrote:

    >>>Although since you apparently want to save money by using silicone,
    >>>you might also try some muffler patch tape.

    >>Won’t hold.  On my old Jimmy I had the same problem – busted boot, and
    >>nothing worked – tried duct tape, tried zip ties… eventually I just
    >>changed the stupid axle.  Wasn’t hard, the biggest problem was that on
    >>my car you had to pop the tie rod for clearance and was worn too and
    >>rusted to the inner tie rod, so one worn CV boot at $5 became a new
    >>axle, new shock, new tie rods and adjuster.

    >>But yeah, the only proper way to fix it is a new axle shaft.

    >>Ray- Hide quoted text –

    >>- Show quoted text –

    > I was making a point…not serious.

    lol.  I figured you were yanking his chain, but like I said, I tried the
    50 cent way of fixing it on a 15 year old truck’s front axles, but ended
    up having to do it the right way because there really is no quick fix
    for a torn boot on a CV joint that’ll hold worth a darn, and if the boot
    is that badly tore up, it’s probably got no grease left in there and is
    full of grit instead.

    Ray

  13. admin says:

    On Sep 23, 7:17 pm, Old Wolf <oldw…@inspire.net.nz> wrote:

    > My car (FWD) has a torn rubber  boot covering the
    > passenger’s side CV joint.

    > The mechanic said it wasn’t possible to silicon it up
    > or anything – it had to be replaced, at a cost comparable
    > to that of replacing the joint entirely (minus parts of course).

    > He also said that if I did nothing, it would dry up within
    > about a month because the grease lubricating it would
    > get flung out the tear in the boot.

    > Is this all correct, and what should I do?

    They sell those automarket "fit all" type of boots in parts
    stores…they don’t cost that much.
    You’ll have to pull out your CV joint and "re-manufacture" it yourself
    though. :)

    Best of luck
    http://www.autorepairforums.net

  14. admin says:

    On Sep 25, 2:03 am, Mike Romain <roma…@sympatico.ca> wrote:

    - Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -

    > Old Wolf wrote:
    > > My car (FWD) has a torn rubber  boot covering the
    > > passenger’s side CV joint.

    > > The mechanic said it wasn’t possible to silicon it up
    > > or anything – it had to be replaced, at a cost comparable
    > > to that of replacing the joint entirely (minus parts of course).

    > > He also said that if I did nothing, it would dry up within
    > > about a month because the grease lubricating it would
    > > get flung out the tear in the boot.

    > > Is this all correct, and what should I do?

    > That is all correct.

    > I would replace the whole thing because the labor to fix it properly is
    > the same or higher due to cleaning as to change it.

    Thanks to everyone for the confirmation. Should I have
    both sides done at once, or just one? (The other side
    has no visible problems).

    (I ask this for the same reason that people recommend
    changing left and right tyres together — in case the new
    part would cause some sort of imbalance compared to
    the old one on the other side)

  15. admin says:

    On 9/24/07 10:10 PM, in article
    1190689829.723445.199…@n39g2000hsh.googlegroups.com, "Old Wolf"

    - Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -

    <oldw…@inspire.net.nz> wrote:
    > On Sep 25, 2:03 am, Mike Romain <roma…@sympatico.ca> wrote:
    >> Old Wolf wrote:
    >>> My car (FWD) has a torn rubber  boot covering the
    >>> passenger’s side CV joint.

    >>> The mechanic said it wasn’t possible to silicon it up
    >>> or anything – it had to be replaced, at a cost comparable
    >>> to that of replacing the joint entirely (minus parts of course).

    >>> He also said that if I did nothing, it would dry up within
    >>> about a month because the grease lubricating it would
    >>> get flung out the tear in the boot.

    >>> Is this all correct, and what should I do?

    >> That is all correct.

    >> I would replace the whole thing because the labor to fix it properly is
    >> the same or higher due to cleaning as to change it.

    > Thanks to everyone for the confirmation. Should I have
    > both sides done at once, or just one? (The other side
    > has no visible problems).

    > (I ask this for the same reason that people recommend
    > changing left and right tyres together — in case the new
    > part would cause some sort of imbalance compared to
    > the old one on the other side)

    If there is nothing wrong with the other side, leave it alone.  While it is
    true that the wear is the same on both sides and if one side is worn out,
    the other is likely in similar condition, it is not a given.  In my
    experience, the other side usually goes one to two years later.  Just keep
    an eye on it (watch for cracks in the boot) while that extra $200 is still
    drawing interest in the bank.

    If a new half axle is out of balance, it is defective and has to be
    replaced.  Changing the other side will not mitigate that.  

  16. admin says:

    On Sep 24, 8:10 pm, Old Wolf <oldw…@inspire.net.nz> wrote:

    - Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -

    > On Sep 25, 2:03 am, Mike Romain <roma…@sympatico.ca> wrote:

    > > Old Wolf wrote:
    > > > My car (FWD) has a torn rubber  boot covering the
    > > > passenger’s side CV joint.

    > > > The mechanic said it wasn’t possible to silicon it up
    > > > or anything – it had to be replaced, at a cost comparable
    > > > to that of replacing the joint entirely (minus parts of course).

    > > > He also said that if I did nothing, it would dry up within
    > > > about a month because the grease lubricating it would
    > > > get flung out the tear in the boot.

    > > > Is this all correct, and what should I do?

    > > That is all correct.

    > > I would replace the whole thing because the labor to fix it properly is
    > > the same or higher due to cleaning as to change it.

    > Thanks to everyone for the confirmation. Should I have
    > both sides done at once, or just one? (The other side
    > has no visible problems).

    > (I ask this for the same reason that people recommend
    > changing left and right tyres together — in case the new
    > part would cause some sort of imbalance compared to
    > the old one on the other side)

    No reason to replace the other side unless it’s worn or the boot is
    cracked/torn as well.  (it might be, if it’s as old as it’s mate) The
    two are independent.

  17. admin says:

    On Mon, 24 Sep 2007 16:19:25 -0700, summer1978 <ser…@donnelly.edu>
    wrote:

    - Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -

    >On Sep 23, 7:17 pm, Old Wolf <oldw…@inspire.net.nz> wrote:
    >> My car (FWD) has a torn rubber  boot covering the
    >> passenger’s side CV joint.

    >> The mechanic said it wasn’t possible to silicon it up
    >> or anything – it had to be replaced, at a cost comparable
    >> to that of replacing the joint entirely (minus parts of course).

    >> He also said that if I did nothing, it would dry up within
    >> about a month because the grease lubricating it would
    >> get flung out the tear in the boot.

    >> Is this all correct, and what should I do?

    >They sell those automarket "fit all" type of boots in parts
    >stores…they don’t cost that much.

    They don’t fit that much either.

    Don
    http://www.donsautomotive.com

    - Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -

    >You’ll have to pull out your CV joint and "re-manufacture" it yourself
    >though. :)

    >Best of luck
    >www.autorepairforums.net

  18. admin says:

    Old Wolf <oldw…@inspire.net.nz> wrote in news:1190689829.723445.199790
    @n39g2000hsh.googlegroups.com:

    > Thanks to everyone for the confirmation. Should I have
    > both sides done at once, or just one? (The other side
    > has no visible problems).

    No need to deal with the other side until the boot starts cracking. (See my
    previous message for how to check the boot for cracking.)

    I would say this though: OEM (factory) driveshafts are typically of far
    better quality and last far longer than any aftermarket replacement. If I
    were you, I would attempt to keep the other shaft as long as possible. You
    do this by replacing the boot BEFORE it splits.

    The cost to replace one outer boot alone can approach the cost of the
    installation of an aftermarket shaft. However, that one boot replacement
    will likely be the last time you ever have to deal with that driveshaft. An
    aftermarket shaft will likely fail on you in a few years.


    Tegger

  19. admin says:

    On Sep 24, 4:14 pm, ray <josespams…@spam.com> wrote:

    - Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -

    > John S. wrote:

    > >>>Although since you apparently want to save money by using silicone,
    > >>>you might also try some muffler patch tape.

    > >>Won’t hold.  On my old Jimmy I had the same problem – busted boot, and
    > >>nothing worked – tried duct tape, tried zip ties… eventually I just
    > >>changed the stupid axle.  Wasn’t hard, the biggest problem was that on
    > >>my car you had to pop the tie rod for clearance and was worn too and
    > >>rusted to the inner tie rod, so one worn CV boot at $5 became a new
    > >>axle, new shock, new tie rods and adjuster.

    > >>But yeah, the only proper way to fix it is a new axle shaft.

    > >>Ray- Hide quoted text –

    > >>- Show quoted text –

    > > I was making a point…not serious.

    > lol.  I figured you were yanking his chain, but like I said, I tried the
    > 50 cent way of fixing it on a 15 year old truck’s front axles, but ended
    > up having to do it the right way because there really is no quick fix
    > for a torn boot on a CV joint that’ll hold worth a darn, and if the boot
    > is that badly tore up, it’s probably got no grease left in there and is
    > full of grit instead.

    > Ray- Hide quoted text –

    > – Show quoted text –

    Or you could just wrap a roll of saran wrap around it. yeehaw!

  20. admin says:

    On Sep 23, 8:17 pm, Old Wolf <oldw…@inspire.net.nz> wrote:

    > My car (FWD) has a torn rubber  boot covering the
    > passenger’s side CV joint.

    > The mechanic said it wasn’t possible to silicon it up
    > or anything – it had to be replaced, at a cost comparable
    > to that of replacing the joint entirely (minus parts of course).

    > He also said that if I did nothing, it would dry up within
    > about a month because the grease lubricating it would
    > get flung out the tear in the boot.

    > Is this all correct, and what should I do?

    Yeah, instead of fixing the CV joint or even just replacing the boot,
    the entire axle shaft is now a semi-routine replacement item. Fairly
    cheap if you get a rebuilt, but some folks believe that they are
    inferior to the expensive new ones. I’ve never had the CV joint fail
    on a rebuilt, but i did have the axle shaft snap once. (on a
    relatively gentle standing start with a Honda civic, no less. I assume
    a manufacturing defect in the axle, not a problem with the CV joint
    rebuilding).

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