Technical aspects of automobiles

Re: vapor lock or blocked fuel filter???

In article <5…@exodus.Eng.Sun.COM> gc…@ssf.Eng.Sun.COM (Gary Chin) writes:
>I have a 1980 Oldsmobile with a 350 V8 4bbl. carb.
>Returning from North Lake Tahoe to San Francisco,
>the engine stalled on Hwy 80 at the Nut Tree Restaurant.
>It would start and stall repeatedly, so that we could
>only drive to the next exit.  After waiting for about
>an hour, the car would start and run around the block
>only to stall again.  After sleeping in a motel that
>night, the car started fine and we drove to the Bay
>Bridge toll plaza where it stalled again.

>Is there a test to see if the problem is vapor lock
>or some other fuel system blockage?

If this trip was within a few weeks of posting date, vapor lock
can be safely eliminated….rarely happens at 30 degrees.  

Sounds more like blockage…although the temperature has been
cold enough to make icing due to water in the gas a problem as
well…     make sure you check ALL of the fuel filters….and
the fuel pump as well.  If you find nothing, try a little
alcohol in the gas tank to absorb the water.

.
posted by admin in Uncategorized and have Comment (1)

One Response to “Re: vapor lock or blocked fuel filter???”

  1. admin says:

    >In article <5…@exodus.Eng.Sun.COM> gc…@ssf.Eng.Sun.COM (Gary Chin) writes:
    >I have a 1980 Oldsmobile with a 350 V8 4bbl. carb.
    >Returning from North Lake Tahoe to San Francisco,
    >the engine stalled on Hwy 80 at the Nut Tree Restaurant.
    >It would start and stall repeatedly, so that we could
    >only drive to the next exit.  After waiting for about

    Well it should be easy enough to check the fuel filter – just take it
    out and try blowing through it.  The resistance should be negligible
    in a good filter.  Aside from watery fuel, another possibility is the
    fuel pump. Still another possibility is a deteriorated fuel hose; perhaps
    the inner wall has crumbled and is partially blocking the hose, or pieces
    have got into the metal fuel line.  I once had a deteriorated fuel hose
    that sort of had a hole in the side.  I don’t remember now why fuel
    didn’t come pouring out the hole; instead it let air in.  Seems like I
    discovered this by trying to blow into the fuel line to see if it was
    plugged; not only was it not plugged, but there was less resistance to
    blowing than I expected.

    A handy tool is a Black&Decker "Rabbit" pump.  Handy for transferring
    gas from the car to the lawnmower.  Also can hook it onto the fuel
    line near the carburetor and pump into a glass container.  If
    you’re able to pump there then you know the system isn’t plugged up.
    If there’s water in the fuel you will see it at the bottom of the
    container (and can pour the fuel back into the tank and then dump
    the water out).
    hay…@ucscc.ucsc.edu
    hay…@ucscc.bitnet

    "Any clod can have the facts, but having opinions is an Art."
            Charles McCabe, San Francisco Chronicle

Place your comment

You must be logged in to post a comment.