Technical aspects of automobiles

Ideas for Rustproofing Floorboards in old car

   I just checked under the car today (1985 Chevy Caprice) to look at
the condition of the floorboards. There is a lot of rusty metal down
there.  In the center there is a 3 foot wide swath which is coated in
transmission fluid, from a slow trans leak which has preserved that
area, where it has blown back from wind during driving. No rust where
there is trans fluid.  :)

   I was thinking of coating the other, rusty areas of the floorboards
with something like   chassis grease, or motor oil,  trans fluid, or
spraying it with Permatex.  My instinct is to go with the chassis
grease, lots of it, applied with an old rag.

  Is there some other grease that is specifically made for coating
rusty metal to prevent further corrosion ??

Thanks in advance for any ideas !

.
posted by admin in Без рубрики and have Comments (20)

20 Responses to “Ideas for Rustproofing Floorboards in old car”

  1. admin says:

    i have heard of sparying diesel fuel at the underside of a car.
    apparently that works quite well. i am not sure about the
    environmental side of this. heating oil would also work as it is
    pretty much the same stuff. Don’t use gasoline, you will incinerate
    yourself and your car.

  2. admin says:

    "Caprice85" <user132…@aol.com> wrote in message

    news:1190580033.501515.89900@d55g2000hsg.googlegroups.com…

    - Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -

    >   I just checked under the car today (1985 Chevy Caprice) to look at
    > the condition of the floorboards. There is a lot of rusty metal down
    > there.  In the center there is a 3 foot wide swath which is coated in
    > transmission fluid, from a slow trans leak which has preserved that
    > area, where it has blown back from wind during driving. No rust where
    > there is trans fluid.  :)

    >   I was thinking of coating the other, rusty areas of the floorboards
    > with something like   chassis grease, or motor oil,  trans fluid, or
    > spraying it with Permatex.  My instinct is to go with the chassis
    > grease, lots of it, applied with an old rag.

    >  Is there some other grease that is specifically made for coating
    > rusty metal to prevent further corrosion ??

    > Thanks in advance for any ideas !

    I have an extended family member who’s a depression era farmer. He never
    gets rid of anything and rust proofs everything.

    When he does an oil change (pinches every penny but knows that money spent
    on oil saves much more in the end) he saves it to a drum. He has two very
    large steel beams on their sides (that are wider than any wheel base he
    owns) coming off a bank on one end and supported by two telephone poles on
    the other. He regularly pulls every vehicle or piece of equipment he has out
    there and fills a paint gun with oil and shoots every inch of it underneath.
    He also has a gizmo he rigged that shoots a stream and gets it in any weep
    holes of frames and etc.

    I can tell you that his stuff lives forever under extreme conditions, but…
    his family, when they still lived at home, used to avoid leaving their cars
    around when he was ‘oilin’ things. They had very full schedules until they
    were sure he was on his next yearly routine… the reason being that those
    cars stunk like the dickunz afterward. As an old farmer he could care less
    but as a teen or young adult impressing friends or chicks it was mortifying
    for a while… but he regularly still runs equipment and vehicles that have
    incredibly high hours and miles on them.

    You also might run into some guff from environmental extremist sorts if you
    were to do this in, say, the back yard of your gated community or anywhere
    else neighbors can neb into your affairs. >:-)  As mentioned in another post
    there is also the flammable aspects that require some common sense in their
    approach.

  3. admin says:

    On Sep 23, 4:40 pm, Caprice85 <user132…@aol.com> wrote:

    - Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -

    >    I just checked under the car today (1985 Chevy Caprice) to look at
    > the condition of the floorboards. There is a lot of rusty metal down
    > there.  In the center there is a 3 foot wide swath which is coated in
    > transmission fluid, from a slow trans leak which has preserved that
    > area, where it has blown back from wind during driving. No rust where
    > there is trans fluid.  :)

    >    I was thinking of coating the other, rusty areas of the floorboards
    > with something like   chassis grease, or motor oil,  trans fluid, or
    > spraying it with Permatex.  My instinct is to go with the chassis
    > grease, lots of it, applied with an old rag.

    >   Is there some other grease that is specifically made for coating
    > rusty metal to prevent further corrosion ??

    > Thanks in advance for any ideas !

    Another option would be to clean all the oily goo and undercoating
    off, then coat with something like POR-15 then follow with some fresh
    spray undercoat.

    nate

  4. admin says:

    - Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -

    Caprice85 wrote:
    >    I just checked under the car today (1985 Chevy Caprice) to look at
    > the condition of the floorboards. There is a lot of rusty metal down
    > there.  In the center there is a 3 foot wide swath which is coated in
    > transmission fluid, from a slow trans leak which has preserved that
    > area, where it has blown back from wind during driving. No rust where
    > there is trans fluid.  :)

    >    I was thinking of coating the other, rusty areas of the floorboards
    > with something like   chassis grease, or motor oil,  trans fluid, or
    > spraying it with Permatex.  My instinct is to go with the chassis
    > grease, lots of it, applied with an old rag.

    >   Is there some other grease that is specifically made for coating
    > rusty metal to prevent further corrosion ??

    > Thanks in advance for any ideas !

    POR-15 works real well. Just knock off all the loose scaly rust and
    spray the panels DON’T SPRAY IT ON THE EXHAUST.

    If you want to DIY something. This is a recipe for a homemade version of
    Waxoyl

    2 1/2 quarts turpentine
    12 oz. beeswax
    1 quart light machine oil

    With a cheese shredder, cut the wax into the turpentine, stir until the
    wax has dissolved, (takes a long time; you can use very low heat (a warm
    room) to aid but be careful) and thin with the machine oil to a
    brushable / sprayable consistency. Apply liberally.

    I’ve made this and used it. Works very well on inner panels and seams.
    Once it fully hardens it is kind of a rubbery wax that bends with the
    panels.

    Or just buy the real thing.


    Steve W.
    Near Cooperstown, New York
    NRA Member
    Pacifism – The theory that if they’d fed
    Jeffrey Dahmer enough human flesh,
    he’d have become a vegan.

  5. admin says:

    Caprice85  <user132…@aol.com> wrote:

    >   I was thinking of coating the other, rusty areas of the floorboards
    >with something like   chassis grease, or motor oil,  trans fluid, or
    >spraying it with Permatex.  My instinct is to go with the chassis
    >grease, lots of it, applied with an old rag.

    >  Is there some other grease that is specifically made for coating
    >rusty metal to prevent further corrosion ??

    You have just described automotive undercoating, except that undercoating
    also has some strong ahesive properties to keep it in place.  Available in
    a convenient spray.

    You DO want to borrow a lift to apply the stuff… it is no fun working
    on jack stands with it.  Either way wear goggles.
    –scott

    "C’est un Nagra.  C’est suisse, et tres, tres precis."

  6. admin says:

    >Another option would be to clean all the oily goo and undercoating
    >off, then coat with something like POR-15 then follow with some fresh
    >spray undercoat.

    >nate

    Agreed. I tried POR-15 on a steel garage door.

    Previously every year I would have to wire wheel,  use Rustoleum
    primer, and then exterior paint. The rust came back every year
    starting in the seams. I’m going on two years now and there is not a
    hint of rust anywhere.

    I also used POR-15 on a air conditioner grate that was entirely
    rusted. It too had to be re-painted every year until POR-15. The
    grate is on its third year and still no rust.

  7. admin says:

    >   I just checked under the car today (1985 Chevy Caprice) to look at
    > the condition of the floorboards. There is a lot of rusty metal down
    > there.  In the center there is a 3 foot wide swath which is coated in
    > transmission fluid, from a slow trans leak which has preserved that
    > area, where it has blown back from wind during driving. No rust where
    > there is trans fluid.  :)

    I don’t mean this to be rude at all, just realistic.

    You have an ’85 Caprice with rusty floorboards and (at least) one
    rusted through fender.  You’re dealing with a 1k car that very likely
    has terminal rust issues.  Just drive the dang thing and be happy with
    it until the rust gets bad enough that you want another one.  Save the
    money you would spend trying to fix it and get you a better one next
    time that doesn’t have the rust issues.

                       Steve B.

  8. admin says:

     Thanks for the replies.   Is Permatex anything like POR 15?   I
    already have a can of Permatex rust treatment. I get the impression
    that POR 15 is better.

    And what about using oil on already exisitng rust? Is the oil
    treatment only good for clean metal, or would it slow down / stop
    existing rust also ?

  9. admin says:

    Caprice85 wrote:
    >  Thanks for the replies.   Is Permatex anything like POR 15?   I
    > already have a can of Permatex rust treatment. I get the impression
    > that POR 15 is better.

    > And what about using oil on already exisitng rust? Is the oil
    > treatment only good for clean metal, or would it slow down / stop
    > existing rust also ?

    Oil will slow existing rust, sure.  But it’s an either/or treatment.
    You either try to degrease it completely and paint it with something
    like POR-15, or whatever Eastwood’s equivalent is (I’m not familiar with
    the Permatex stuff) OR you treat it with oil and try to "hold the line."

    nate


    replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
    http://members.cox.net/njnagel

  10. admin says:

    On Sep 23, 4:40 pm, Caprice85 <user132…@aol.com> wrote:

    - Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -

    >    I just checked under the car today (1985 Chevy Caprice) to look at
    > the condition of the floorboards. There is a lot of rusty metal down
    > there.  In the center there is a 3 foot wide swath which is coated in
    > transmission fluid, from a slow trans leak which has preserved that
    > area, where it has blown back from wind during driving. No rust where
    > there is trans fluid.  :)

    >    I was thinking of coating the other, rusty areas of the floorboards
    > with something like   chassis grease, or motor oil,  trans fluid, or
    > spraying it with Permatex.  My instinct is to go with the chassis
    > grease, lots of it, applied with an old rag.

    >   Is there some other grease that is specifically made for coating
    > rusty metal to prevent further corrosion ??

    > Thanks in advance for any ideas !

    Well, you have a 23 year old car that shows visible rust on the
    floorboards. Was the car used in snow and on salted roads?  If so you
    probably have a lot more rust than is visible.  The chances are
    excellent that there is a lot of rust in areas you can’t see as well.
    Coating the rusty areas with oil or some other product will slow the
    visible rust down but won’t do much for the rust you can’t get to.

    If you are planning on keeping the car you might want to look into
    having the underside inspected and possible rebuilt.

  11. admin says:

    On Sep 24, 5:03 am, "John S." <hjs…@cs.com> wrote:

    - Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -

    > On Sep 23, 4:40 pm, Caprice85 <user132…@aol.com> wrote:

    > >    I just checked under the car today (1985 Chevy Caprice) to look at
    > > the condition of the floorboards. There is a lot of rusty metal down
    > > there.  In the center there is a 3 foot wide swath which is coated in
    > > transmission fluid, from a slow trans leak which has preserved that
    > > area, where it has blown back from wind during driving. No rust where
    > > there is trans fluid.  :)

    > >    I was thinking of coating the other, rusty areas of the floorboards
    > > with something like   chassis grease, or motor oil,  trans fluid, or
    > > spraying it with Permatex.  My instinct is to go with the chassis
    > > grease, lots of it, applied with an old rag.

    > >   Is there some other grease that is specifically made for coating
    > > rusty metal to prevent further corrosion ??

    > > Thanks in advance for any ideas !

    > Well, you have a 23 year old car that shows visible rust on the
    > floorboards. Was the car used in snow and on salted roads?  If so you
    > probably have a lot more rust than is visible.  The chances are
    > excellent that there is a lot of rust in areas you can’t see as well.
    > Coating the rusty areas with oil or some other product will slow the
    > visible rust down but won’t do much for the rust you can’t get to.

    > If you are planning on keeping the car you might want to look into
    > having the underside inspected and possible rebuilt.- Hide quoted text –

    > – Show quoted text –

    Yes, this car has been driven in  a salty northern winter every year.

    I’ve been looking for a replacement car, like another Caprice with no
    rust, or a Crown Vic / Grand Marquis.   But this 85 keeps running
    fairly trouble-free except for cosmetic problems, so I keep getting it
    past inspection "one more year" again and again. It’s not costing me
    much money at all, just some time, and I’m willing to spend a few
    hours on the weekend to patch it up.  At the present time, it looks
    pretty good, I must say, after I painted it.      :)

  12. admin says:

    On Sep 23, 7:09 pm, klu…@panix.com (Scott Dorsey) wrote:

    - Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -

    > Caprice85  <user132…@aol.com> wrote:

    > >   I was thinking of coating the other, rusty areas of the floorboards
    > >with something like   chassis grease, or motor oil,  trans fluid, or
    > >spraying it with Permatex.  My instinct is to go with the chassis
    > >grease, lots of it, applied with an old rag.

    > >  Is there some other grease that is specifically made for coating
    > >rusty metal to prevent further corrosion ??

    > You have just described automotive undercoating, except that undercoating
    > also has some strong ahesive properties to keep it in place.  Available in
    > a convenient spray.

    > You DO want to borrow a lift to apply the stuff… it is no fun working
    > on jack stands with it.  Either way wear goggles.
    > –scott
    > —
    > "C’est un Nagra.  C’est suisse, et tres, tres precis."

    undercoating straight over rust (at least the usual "rubberized
    undercoating" that comes in a spray can) is a recipe for disaster.
    I’d rather have bare metal than that stuff, it won’t rust as quickly.

    nate

  13. admin says:

    Back in the 1950s, I read an article in Popular Mechanics magazine about
    a guy who bought a new 1950 Ford car.The first thing he did with his car
    was to apply roofing tar (that stuff you can buy at Home Depot,
    Lowes/similar building supply stores) to the bottom of his car, then he
    removed the interior door panels and he applied roofing tar to the
    inside of the doors.He said it helps rust proof the car and makes it
    ride quieter too.
    cuhulin

  14. admin says:

    N8N  <njna…@hotmail.com> wrote:

    >undercoating straight over rust (at least the usual "rubberized
    >undercoating" that comes in a spray can) is a recipe for disaster.
    >I’d rather have bare metal than that stuff, it won’t rust as quickly.

    Is it?  I have always used the Permatex stuff and it seems to be okay
    on slightly rusty surface, it at least doesn’t trap water and make the
    problem worse or anything.  I have also used it in combination with the
    Locktite rust stabilizer too.  Am I to be expecting a big problem a decade
    down the road?
    –scott

    "C’est un Nagra.  C’est suisse, et tres, tres precis."

  15. admin says:

    In article <27224-46F7DC3A-1…@storefull-3254.bay.webtv.net>,

     <cuhu…@webtv.net> wrote:
    >Back in the 1950s, I read an article in Popular Mechanics magazine about
    >a guy who bought a new 1950 Ford car.The first thing he did with his car
    >was to apply roofing tar (that stuff you can buy at Home Depot,
    >Lowes/similar building supply stores) to the bottom of his car, then he
    >removed the interior door panels and he applied roofing tar to the
    >inside of the doors.He said it helps rust proof the car and makes it
    >ride quieter too.

    I can believe that, but I bet a hundred pounds of roofing tar isn’t going
    to help the gas mileage or acceleration much.
    –scott

    "C’est un Nagra.  C’est suisse, et tres, tres precis."

  16. admin says:

    On Sep 24, 2:11 pm, klu…@panix.com (Scott Dorsey) wrote:

    > N8N  <njna…@hotmail.com> wrote:

    > >undercoating straight over rust (at least the usual "rubberized
    > >undercoating" that comes in a spray can) is a recipe for disaster.
    > >I’d rather have bare metal than that stuff, it won’t rust as quickly.

    > Is it?  I have always used the Permatex stuff and it seems to be okay
    > on slightly rusty surface, it at least doesn’t trap water and make the
    > problem worse or anything.  I have also used it in combination with the
    > Locktite rust stabilizer too.  Am I to be expecting a big problem a decade
    > down the road?
    > –scott
    > —
    > "C’est un Nagra.  C’est suisse, et tres, tres precis."

    Maybe,  I don’t know about the Permatex stuff in particular; I haven’t
    seen that brand sold locally and to be honest I don’t know what *is* –
    but I have seen water get trapped under home-applied undercoating
    before ( and to be honest, some factory-applied undercoating as well)
    making a whole mess of things.

    Bottom line, I far prefer paint to undercoating.

    I do like the light-colored waxy stuff that is common on German cars.
    that stuff really seems to work well, and it flows when it gets hot,
    so it is to some extent self-healing, although of course that means in
    hot weather you get a little goo out the bottom of the door drains
    etc. – a small price to pay IMHO.

    nate

  17. admin says:

    Scott Dorsey wrote:
    > In article <27224-46F7DC3A-1…@storefull-3254.bay.webtv.net>,
    >  <cuhu…@webtv.net> wrote:

    >>Back in the 1950s, I read an article in Popular Mechanics magazine about
    >>a guy who bought a new 1950 Ford car.The first thing he did with his car
    >>was to apply roofing tar (that stuff you can buy at Home Depot,
    >>Lowes/similar building supply stores) to the bottom of his car, then he
    >>removed the interior door panels and he applied roofing tar to the
    >>inside of the doors.He said it helps rust proof the car and makes it
    >>ride quieter too.

    > I can believe that, but I bet a hundred pounds of roofing tar isn’t going
    > to help the gas mileage or acceleration much.

    A hundred pounds of soundproofing is *nothing*. Modern cars easily
    contain twice to 4 times that much mass solely dedicated to sound
    suppression.

  18. admin says:

    On Sep 24, 8:47 am, Caprice85 <user132…@aol.com> wrote:

    - Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -

    > On Sep 24, 5:03 am, "John S." <hjs…@cs.com> wrote:

    > > On Sep 23, 4:40 pm, Caprice85 <user132…@aol.com> wrote:

    > > >    I just checked under the car today (1985 Chevy Caprice) to look at
    > > > the condition of the floorboards. There is a lot of rusty metal down
    > > > there.  In the center there is a 3 foot wide swath which is coated in
    > > > transmission fluid, from a slow trans leak which has preserved that
    > > > area, where it has blown back from wind during driving. No rust where
    > > > there is trans fluid.  :)

    > > >    I was thinking of coating the other, rusty areas of the floorboards
    > > > with something like   chassis grease, or motor oil,  trans fluid, or
    > > > spraying it with Permatex.  My instinct is to go with the chassis
    > > > grease, lots of it, applied with an old rag.

    > > >   Is there some other grease that is specifically made for coating
    > > > rusty metal to prevent further corrosion ??

    > > > Thanks in advance for any ideas !

    > > Well, you have a 23 year old car that shows visible rust on the
    > > floorboards. Was the car used in snow and on salted roads?  If so you
    > > probably have a lot more rust than is visible.  The chances are
    > > excellent that there is a lot of rust in areas you can’t see as well.
    > > Coating the rusty areas with oil or some other product will slow the
    > > visible rust down but won’t do much for the rust you can’t get to.

    > > If you are planning on keeping the car you might want to look into
    > > having the underside inspected and possible rebuilt.- Hide quoted text –

    > > – Show quoted text –

    > Yes, this car has been driven in  a salty northern winter every year.

    > I’ve been looking for a replacement car, like another Caprice with no
    > rust, or a Crown Vic / Grand Marquis.   But this 85 keeps running
    > fairly trouble-free except for cosmetic problems, so I keep getting it
    > past inspection "one more year" again and again. It’s not costing me
    > much money at all, just some time, and I’m willing to spend a few
    > hours on the weekend to patch it up.  At the present time, it looks
    > pretty good, I must say, after I painted it.      :)- Hide quoted text –

    > – Show quoted text –

    You might pull the carpets up to see if there is any rusting or
    perforation visible from the inside.  You might also consider having a
    body shop take a look at the undercarriage and get their take on how
    sturdy it is.  They are a reliable car and you’ve certainly got your
    money back on this one.  Keep it running for as long as possible and
    consider spending a few bucks to do so.  The alternative is spending a
    lot more money an another car.

    A family member in California had the floorboards rust completely
    through on a chevy wagon after 12 years, so it can happen.  Cause was
    water dripping ino the carpet because of a bad door seal.

  19. admin says:

    - Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -

    On Sun, 23 Sep 2007 13:40:33 -0700, Caprice85 wrote:

    >    I just checked under the car today (1985 Chevy Caprice) to look at
    > the condition of the floorboards. There is a lot of rusty metal down
    > there.  In the center there is a 3 foot wide swath which is coated in
    > transmission fluid, from a slow trans leak which has preserved that area,
    > where it has blown back from wind during driving. No rust where there is
    > trans fluid.  :)

    >    I was thinking of coating the other, rusty areas of the floorboards
    > with something like   chassis grease, or motor oil,  trans fluid, or
    > spraying it with Permatex.  My instinct is to go with the chassis grease,
    > lots of it, applied with an old rag.

    >   Is there some other grease that is specifically made for coating
    > rusty metal to prevent further corrosion ??

    > Thanks in advance for any ideas !

    I spray mine with hydraulic oil, then drive down a dirt road.

  20. admin says:

    On Sep 23, 7:09 pm, klu…@panix.com (Scott Dorsey) wrote:

    - Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -

    > Caprice85  <user132…@aol.com> wrote:

    > >   I was thinking of coating the other, rusty areas of the floorboards
    > >with something like   chassis grease, or motor oil,  trans fluid, or
    > >spraying it with Permatex.  My instinct is to go with the chassis
    > >grease, lots of it, applied with an old rag.

    > >  Is there some other grease that is specifically made for coating
    > >rusty metal to prevent further corrosion ??

    > You have just described automotive undercoating, except that undercoating
    > also has some strong ahesive properties to keep it in place.  Available in
    > a convenient spray.

    > You DO want to borrow a lift to apply the stuff… it is no fun working
    > on jack stands with it.  Either way wear goggles.
    > –scott
    > —
    > "C’est un Nagra.  C’est suisse, et tres, tres precis."

    Got to maintain the undercoating, though; when it eventually gets
    loosish, it will then start to trap moisture, dirt, salt etc. against
    the metal unless you remove the loose crap and reapply a new coat.

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