Technical aspects of automobiles

1985 Honda Accord, Frozen Caliper Slider

My girlfriend has a ’85 Accord and the front right caliper won’t slide.
 The Piston still works.

Called around and we can’t get the bracket, but we can get the caliper.
 What’s the recommended way to replace this?  Can I unfreeze the
bracket, and if I do, will it still be OK to use with a new caliper and
pins?  What’s the best way to unfreeze the bracket (already tried
penetrating oil)?  Do we need a new caliper, or can I just get the pins
and the rubber bushings (they’re done for).

TIA.

.
posted by admin in Без рубрики and have Comments (13)

13 Responses to “1985 Honda Accord, Frozen Caliper Slider”

  1. admin says:

    In article <1163537473.407628.206…@m73g2000cwd.googlegroups.com>, Larry Bud wrote:
    > My girlfriend has a ’85 Accord and the front right caliper won’t slide.
    >  The Piston still works.

    > Called around and we can’t get the bracket, but we can get the caliper.
    >  What’s the recommended way to replace this?  Can I unfreeze the
    > bracket, and if I do, will it still be OK to use with a new caliper and
    > pins?  What’s the best way to unfreeze the bracket (already tried
    > penetrating oil)?  Do we need a new caliper, or can I just get the pins
    > and the rubber bushings (they’re done for).

    It depends if you can get the pins free. I’ve had two encounters with
    siezed pins. One I had to buy new brackets as I was unable to free the
    pins from the bracket. The bracket came with new pins. On the other I was
    able to free them and thankfully they weren’t rusted in, just stuck and
    were in good condition.

    Basically what you want to do is to get the pins out without marring the
    sliding surfaces (on either part) or any threads for attaching bolts should
    there be any. Once you get them out then you can see if they are still good.

    I can’t recall exactly what I did, but it involved making a little press
    out of the various pullers and tools I have that hooked to the bracket such
    that I could push them out. Probably also used something simple like
    pentrating oil as well. Once out everything got a good clean up and good
    greasing with brake lube.

    Another thing to consider is going to a self serve salvage yard and
    seeing if there’s an ’85 accord you can take the caliper brackets off of.

    There is no need to replace the caliper based on your discription unless
    there has been some unusual damage to it or there is something else wrong
    you didn’t mention.

  2. admin says:

    "Larry Bud" <larrybud2…@yahoo.com> wrote in news:1163537473.407628.206590
    @m73g2000cwd.googlegroups.com:

    > My girlfriend has a ’85 Accord and the front right caliper won’t slide.
    >  The Piston still works.

    > Called around and we can’t get the bracket, but we can get the caliper.
    >  What’s the recommended way to replace this?  Can I unfreeze the
    > bracket, and if I do, will it still be OK to use with a new caliper and
    > pins?  What’s the best way to unfreeze the bracket (already tried
    > penetrating oil)?  Do we need a new caliper, or can I just get the pins
    > and the rubber bushings (they’re done for).

    Can you remove the lower bolt? If so, you should be able to carefully
    lever/swivel/wiggle the caliper off the upper pin.

    The problem is rust, which can be sanded off once surfaces are exposed.

    How do you mean the parts are "done for"? So long as the rubber’s not
    split, the parts can usually be reused. You might need lots of 50-grit
    emery cloth and Sil-Glyde, but it ought to be restorable.


    TeGGeR®

  3. admin says:

    "Larry Bud" <larrybud2…@yahoo.com> wrote in message

    news:1163537473.407628.206590@m73g2000cwd.googlegroups.com…

    > My girlfriend has a ’85 Accord and the front right caliper won’t slide.
    >  The Piston still works.

    > Called around and we can’t get the bracket, but we can get the caliper.
    >  What’s the recommended way to replace this?  Can I unfreeze the
    > bracket, and if I do, will it still be OK to use with a new caliper and
    > pins?  What’s the best way to unfreeze the bracket (already tried
    > penetrating oil)?

    What penetrating oil did you try?

    A lot of people are under the impression WD-40 is a penetrating
    oil, they squirt that on there and when the part doesen’t free up they
    give up.

    Ted

  4. admin says:

    - Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -

    Ted Mittelstaedt wrote:
    > "Larry Bud" <larrybud2…@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    > news:1163537473.407628.206590@m73g2000cwd.googlegroups.com…
    > > My girlfriend has a ’85 Accord and the front right caliper won’t slide.
    > >  The Piston still works.

    > > Called around and we can’t get the bracket, but we can get the caliper.
    > >  What’s the recommended way to replace this?  Can I unfreeze the
    > > bracket, and if I do, will it still be OK to use with a new caliper and
    > > pins?  What’s the best way to unfreeze the bracket (already tried
    > > penetrating oil)?

    > What penetrating oil did you try?

    > A lot of people are under the impression WD-40 is a penetrating
    > oil, they squirt that on there and when the part doesen’t free up they
    > give up.

    I forget the name, but it’s not WD-40.  It’s a real penetrating oil.

  5. admin says:

    - Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -

    TeGGeR® wrote:
    > "Larry Bud" <larrybud2…@yahoo.com> wrote in news:1163537473.407628.206590
    > @m73g2000cwd.googlegroups.com:

    > > My girlfriend has a ’85 Accord and the front right caliper won’t slide.
    > >  The Piston still works.

    > > Called around and we can’t get the bracket, but we can get the caliper.
    > >  What’s the recommended way to replace this?  Can I unfreeze the
    > > bracket, and if I do, will it still be OK to use with a new caliper and
    > > pins?  What’s the best way to unfreeze the bracket (already tried
    > > penetrating oil)?  Do we need a new caliper, or can I just get the pins
    > > and the rubber bushings (they’re done for).

    > Can you remove the lower bolt? If so, you should be able to carefully
    > lever/swivel/wiggle the caliper off the upper pin.

    > The problem is rust, which can be sanded off once surfaces are exposed.

    > How do you mean the parts are "done for"? So long as the rubber’s not
    > split, the parts can usually be reused. You might need lots of 50-grit
    > emery cloth and Sil-Glyde, but it ought to be restorable.

    The rubber bushing is history.  The rest of the parts, I don’t know.  I
    should be able to move the lower bolt.  The bottom pin is free, it’s
    the top one that’s frozen.

  6. admin says:

    "Larry Bud" wrote:      1985 Honda Accord

    The front right brake caliper is frozen; won’t slide.
    The Piston still works.   I called around and can’t
    get the bracket but can get the caliper.

    Can I unfreeze the bracket, and if I do, will it still
    be OK to use with a new caliper and pins?
    What’s the best way to unfreeze the bracket
    (already tried penetrating oil)?
    _______________________________________

    "Ted Mittelstaedt"  wrote:

    What penetrating oil did you try?  A lot of people
    are under the impression WD-40 is a penetrating
    oil, they squirt that on there and when the part
    doesen’t free up they give up.
    ________________________________________

    WD-40 could have caused the original freeze-up.
    It penetrates some at first, but when its aromatic
    portion evaporates, it leaves a hygroscopic residue
    that attracts moisture and causes parts to rust.

    Soak it well with a better penetrant, let it sit a
    few hours, and try again.  My favorite penetrant
    is PB Blaster, but many others are available.

    Good luck.

    Rodan.

  7. admin says:

    "Larry Bud" <larrybud2…@yahoo.com> wrote in
    news:1163596622.584378.257980@f16g2000cwb.googlegroups.com:

    > TeGGeR® wrote:

    <snip>

    >> How do you mean the parts are "done for"? So long as the rubber’s not
    >> split, the parts can usually be reused. You might need lots of
    >> 50-grit emery cloth and Sil-Glyde, but it ought to be restorable.

    > The rubber bushing is history.  The rest of the parts, I don’t know.
    > I should be able to move the lower bolt.  The bottom pin is free, it’s
    > the top one that’s frozen.

    If I remember correctly (been a while), the top one stays where it is.
    It does not come off. The caliper should slip off the upper pin once the
    lower bolt is removed.

    I’d suggest removing the lower bolt, pivoting the caliper free of the
    pads and rotor, then trying to wiggle/pull until the caliper comes off
    the upper pin.

    Bring the rubber parts to your dealer and tell him what car they come
    from. Honda’s parts inventory goes back quite a ways, and they may be
    able to find similar or same parts from a later model.


    TeGGeR®

  8. admin says:

    - Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -

    > >> How do you mean the parts are "done for"? So long as the rubber’s not
    > >> split, the parts can usually be reused. You might need lots of
    > >> 50-grit emery cloth and Sil-Glyde, but it ought to be restorable.

    > > The rubber bushing is history.  The rest of the parts, I don’t know.
    > > I should be able to move the lower bolt.  The bottom pin is free, it’s
    > > the top one that’s frozen.
    > If I remember correctly (been a while), the top one stays where it is.
    > It does not come off. The caliper should slip off the upper pin once the
    > lower bolt is removed.

    > I’d suggest removing the lower bolt, pivoting the caliper free of the
    > pads and rotor, then trying to wiggle/pull until the caliper comes off
    > the upper pin.

    > Bring the rubber parts to your dealer and tell him what car they come
    > from. Honda’s parts inventory goes back quite a ways, and they may be
    > able to find similar or same parts from a later model.

    I found the rubber part online, so I’m good to so.  I’ll give this a
    shot tomorrow night.  Thx all for the help!

  9. admin says:

    y_p_w wrote:
    > I like reading the Tire Rack reviews, but sort of take
    > their numerical rating system with a grain of salt.
    > People are assessing these tires on different cars with
    > different sizes and different expectations.  I wonder
    > when some Summer tire that I assume would have some
    > incredible grip gets a higher dry traction survey
    > rating than a better than average all-season
    > performance tire.

    Sorry – I meant "why would a Summer tire get a lower
    rating than an all-season tire?".

  10. admin says:

    In article <Zom6h.6576$L6.5…@newsread3.news.pas.earthlink.net>, y_p_w wrote:
    > Sorry – I meant "why would a Summer tire get a lower
    > rating than an all-season tire?".

    Because some summer tires might not be as good or you said it yourself,
    different expectations. Someone’s idea of great grip for an all season
    might be just average in that same person’s mind for a summer tire.

  11. admin says:

    y_p_w wrote:
    > y_p_w wrote:

    > > I like reading the Tire Rack reviews, but sort of take
    > > their numerical rating system with a grain of salt.
    > > People are assessing these tires on different cars with
    > > different sizes and different expectations.  I wonder
    > > when some Summer tire that I assume would have some
    > > incredible grip gets a higher dry traction survey
    > > rating than a better than average all-season
    > > performance tire.

    > Sorry – I meant "why would a Summer tire get a lower
    > rating than an all-season tire?".

    A lower rating in which regard?  At first you were talking about speed
    ratings, but then it seems you switched to traction ratings.

    Speed ratings have nothing to do with tread or tire size.  It’s all
    about tire carcass construction- using different amounts and types of
    materials to allow the tire to withstand higher amounts of centrifugal
    forces and temperatures at speed.

    Traction ratings tend to be more related to the chemical composition of
    the exterior, tread design (how much tread area is on the road wet or
    dry) etc.  Generally more ‘grippy’ performance tires are softer, and
    high-mileage/economy/all season tires are of harder compound, but there
    are some exceptions.

    And of course, (like you said), the vehicle they are on affects
    everything too.

    -phaeton

  12. admin says:

    - Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -

    phaeton wrote:
    > y_p_w wrote:
    > > y_p_w wrote:

    > > > I like reading the Tire Rack reviews, but sort of take
    > > > their numerical rating system with a grain of salt.
    > > > People are assessing these tires on different cars with
    > > > different sizes and different expectations.  I wonder
    > > > when some Summer tire that I assume would have some
    > > > incredible grip gets a higher dry traction survey
    > > > rating than a better than average all-season
    > > > performance tire.

    > > Sorry – I meant "why would a Summer tire get a lower
    > > rating than an all-season tire?".

    > A lower rating in which regard?  At first you were talking about speed
    > ratings, but then it seems you switched to traction ratings.

    Just a "while I’m here" additional comment.

    > Speed ratings have nothing to do with tread or tire size.  It’s all
    > about tire carcass construction- using different amounts and types of
    > materials to allow the tire to withstand higher amounts of centrifugal
    > forces and temperatures at speed.

    I’m just wondering if there’s actually any difference when the same
    model of tire comes in different sizes that should result in a
    different speed rating.  I would think that part of the ability to
    resist temps and/or dissapate heat has to do with the tread
    compound.  Again – there was that Michelin Pilot Exalto in
    205/55R15.  I’m curious as to what justifies $143 for the V
    rated version vesus $103 (reg price) for the H rated version.

    > Traction ratings tend to be more related to the chemical composition of
    > the exterior, tread design (how much tread area is on the road wet or
    > dry) etc.  Generally more ‘grippy’ performance tires are softer, and
    > high-mileage/economy/all season tires are of harder compound, but there
    > are some exceptions.

    I always wondered about that.  Many of the super-grippy high
    performance Summer tires I’ve seen are harder than all-season
    treads.  I’ve even heard that many of these Summer tires can be
    ridiculously hard at cold Winter temps.  It seems to run counter
    to the logic of Summer tires being softer for better grip.

    > And of course, (like you said), the vehicle they are on affects
    > everything too.

    Yep.  I like the Tire Rack reviews, but I think a better course
    would be to actually read the reviews from people with similar
    vehicles and/or tire size.

  13. admin says:

    y_p_w wrote:
    > I always wondered about that.  Many of the super-grippy high
    > performance Summer tires I’ve seen are harder than all-season
    > treads.  I’ve even heard that many of these Summer tires can be
    > ridiculously hard at cold Winter temps.  It seems to run counter
    > to the logic of Summer tires being softer for better grip.

    ahh… but summer tires with a "high" like Y speed rating need to be
    able to withstand the heat generated from sustained high speed running,
    and thus have a hard tread compound when cold.

    my Kumho ECSTA MX’s on my Trans Am are like this – they need some heat
    in them to have any grip – if I drive the car when it’s say 5 above
    freezing it’s like driving on ice until they have driven about 10 miles.

    Ray

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